Permitted, if the packaging and all nonalcoholic promotional items are provided at no expense to the retailer, regardless of where the combination packages are assembled. Access to promotional packaging must be equally available to all Oklahoma retailers, subject to the reasonable supplies of such packaging and the terms of the promotion. Access by the retailers shall be commensurate to the needs of the retailers based on the stock of the supplier’s product carried by the retailer. Suppliers shall only be required to carry reasonable supplies of the promotional packaging or items and must make a good faith effort to ratably distribute such them to those retailers who desire them. [OK Law, Title 37A, Chapter 3, Sections 3-117 and 3-123(E)(14).]

Industry members may package and distribute alcoholic liquor, wine, beer, or canned cocktails in combination with other non-alcoholic items or products, provided that the items have no secondary value to the retailer other than having the potential of attracting purchasers and promoting sales. The combination package must be designed to be delivered intact to the consumer and the additional cost incurred by the industry member shall be included in the cost to the retailers. [IA Regulations, Title 185, Chapter 16, Section 185-16.11(123).] Note: Industry members who sell alcoholic liquor to the Alcoholic Beverages Division must comply with the Division’s policies regarding combination packaging.

Combination packages or Value Added Packs (VAPs) may be permitted at the discretion of the Division of Liquor Control, under the following guidelines: Any potential packaging must be submitted for prior approval. Approval or disapproval of the package will be based on the quality of any premium item included, its relationship to the product it is packaged with, or alcoholic beverages in general, and the sales potential of the package. Alcoholic beverages may not be given away with the purchase of other merchandise or any other thing of value. However, an alcoholic beverage may be packaged with a nonalcoholic item without increasing the price of the alcoholic beverage. The Ohio Division of Liquor Control does not dictate what a supplier[…]

Industry members may package and distribute alcoholic liquor, wine, beer, or canned cocktail in combination with other non-alcoholic items or products, provided that the items have no secondary value to the retailer other than having the potential of attracting purchasers and promoting sales. The combination package must be designed to be delivered intact to the consumer and the additional cost incurred by the industry member shall be included in the cost to the retailers. [IA Regulations, Title 185, Chapter 16, Section 185-16.11(123).] Note: Industry members selling alcoholic liquor to the Alcoholic Beverages Division must comply with the Division’s policies regarding combination packaging.

Permitted. Alcoholic beverages may not be given away with the purchase of other merchandise or any other thing of value. However, an alcoholic beverage may be packaged with a nonalcoholic item without increasing the price of the alcoholic beverage. The Ohio Division of Liquor Control does not dictate what a supplier may add to a combination package; however, they discourage the addition of food products because unlike alcoholic beverages, foods have a limited shelf life. [OH Regulations, Chapter 4301:1-1, Sections 4301:1-1-43(B)(6) and 4301:1-1-46(D); written advice from the Ohio Division of Liquor Control, September 12, 2019.] Price posting is not required. However, pricing for combination packages must be included on a quarterly price schedule maintained and furnished to all “A-1-A,” “B-2”[…]

Industry members may package and distribute alcoholic beverages in combination with other non-alcoholic items, as originally packaged by the supplier for sale to consumers. Notwithstanding any provision of the law to the contrary, wholesalers are not required to charge more for such non-alcoholic items than their actual cost. [MO Law, Title XX, Chapter 311, Section 311.070, Subsection 4(8).] Combination packages do not require label approval unless the label has changed and the changes do not fall within the list of allowable changes to already approved labels. [ATC Industry Circular, Combination Packaging, issued September 3, 2019.]

Permitted. However, the City of Chicago has banned any alcoholic beverage container which is four ounces (4 oz.) or smaller for off-sale consumption. This means that 100 ml and 50 ml containers may not be sold within the Chicago city limits, whether individually or in a combination package with a larger size container.

Combination or co-pack packages are permitted. The price charged by the supplier must cover the cost of the products included in the combination package, and the packaging and merchandising of the package must not give consumers the impression that when purchasing the item they are receiving anything of value for free. [Email from CA ABC Trade Enforcement Unit, August 16, 2018.]

Permitted under federal guidelines. Refer to Title 27 CFR Part 6.93 of the federal regulations for specific details. Delaware regulations do not specifically address what is permitted, but simply state that suppliers may not engage in any practices not permitted by the Federal Alcohol Administration Act. [DE Regulations, Rule 908, Section 3.3.]

Permitted. Retail liquor stores may sell any non-alcohol products and may combine both food and non-food items with the sales of alcoholic beverages, as long as the sales of non-alcohol products do not exceed twenty percent (20%) of the retail liquor store’s annual gross revenues. Note: On-packs—which consist of a smaller size container packaged with a larger size of the same or different product—are permissible, as long as the package is designed to be delivered intact to the consumer. [CO Regulations, Regulation 47-416.]